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Conrad Roy's Family Speaks Out About Michelle Carter's Sentencing

Conrad Roy's Family Speaks Out About Michelle Carter's Sentencing

During a courageous interview on live television Friday morning, Conrad Roy's cousin said that the stayed sentence for Michelle Carter is "not enough".

"You can't think about it".

Knox argued that Carter spent months trying to deter Roy from killing himself, noting that Carter was mentally ill herself and that she wasn't equipped to handle his own depression, and said that Roy's suicide was ultimately his own choice.

Prosecutors, who asked for at least a seven-year prison sentence, said Carter needs to be held accountable. "I just want to make sure tonight is the real thing", "You just have to do it" and "It's painless and quick". The family's attorney told Boston25News.com the plan is for the family to memorialize Conrad Roy III. "Like I don't get why you aren't".

Carter will also serve five years of probation, but will remain out of jail until her appeals in state courts are exhausted.

In dozens of text messages, Carter urged Roy to follow through on his talk of taking his own life.

Judge Moniz while declaring the sentence said it "a tragedy for two families". "I was on the phone with him and he got out of the vehicle because it was working and he got scared, and I (expletive) told him to get back in", Carter wrote on September 15, 2014, in a message to a friend. A virtual lynch mob of online commentators had heaped invective on Carter, calling her a witch who should be locked away for years. A psychiatrist testified during the trial that Carter was delusional after having recently switched to a new antidepressant. Where was her humanity? "In what world is this behaviour OK and acceptable?" He said his appeal will be based on several grounds, including his argument Carter's text messages and conversations with Roy amounted to free speech protected by the Constitution. Moniz already ruled that Carter's actions were "wanton" and "reckless", two standards of Massachusetts' wrongful death statute - and did so in criminal court, where the burden of proof is much higher.

"I can not begin to describe the despair I feel over the loss of my son", Roy's father Conrad Roy Jr. said. But members of the Roy family, some of whom voiced dissatisfaction with the stay in Carter's sentence yesterday, could also see the case through to a jury if they want a more public form of justice.

A teenage sister, Camden Roy, recalled her 13 years with her older brother and said she's "haunted" by the realization she'll never see him Wednesday or be an aunt to his children.

"I am heartbroken", the father said. Although they lived close by, they rarely saw one another, confining their relationship to text messages and telephone calls.

If you are affected by any of the issues raised in this article, please call the Samaritans on (free) 116123 or 020 7734 2800.

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