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Google's Latest Search Feature Lets You Find Out If You're Depressed

Google's Latest Search Feature Lets You Find Out If You're Depressed

The company launched a questionnaire which helps people figure out if they are among the victims of depression. The objective is to help people who are depressed but are not sure if it is serious enough to seek help. Now, anybody in the U.S. searching for the term "clinical depression" will be offered the possibility to take a test that would assist in determining the level of the depression symptoms. The users will then be directed to the clinically validated PHQ-9 test, which tries and detect depression through asking about a user's amount of energy, appetite and concentration levels.

And if the user clicks on it, he or she will be presented with a private questionnaire. The famous search engine will now have a new gold standard questionnaire which is said to be developed in collaboration with the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NIMA). This also aims to encourage those who have never sought treatment to overcome their hesitation.

A recent study says that, once every two seconds, a person searches Google for depression, and the number of these searchers has doubled in the last five years.

Nowadays, many people are suffering from depression, but only half of them get to receive the treatment they need. He also added that the PHQ-9 score will definitely give a good indication to the people whether to go for depression treatment or not because it is designed by experts and will not confuse them with other regular search results whose information are not always reliable. This way, you can privately self-assess to determine the level of depression. In fact, majority might not even realize they have this condition, so Google chose to come to their help. "The PHQ-9 can be the first step to getting a proper diagnosis".

In case of depression, a form of mental illness, it has been determined that one of five people in the USA suffer from episodes of clinical depression.

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